In the Bubble has ratings and 16 reviews. Kars said: It’s interesting to read this eight years after publication. The parts where Thackara heaps exam. So asks author John Thackara in his new book, In the Bubble: Designing for a Complex World. These are tough questions for the pushers of technology to. In the Bubble: Designing in a Complex World. Author: John Thackara. Publication : Cover Image citations per article, View colleagues of John Thackara.

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In the Bubble : Designing in A Complex World

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Return to Book Page. Preview hhackara In the Bubble by John Thackara. Designing in a Complex World by John Thackara. How to design a world in which we rely less on stuff, and more on people.

We’re filling up the world with technology and devices, but we’ve lost sight of an important question: What is this stuff for? What value does it add to our lives? So asks author John Thackara in his new book, In the Bubble: Designing for a Complex World. These are tough questions for the pushers of t How to design a world in which we rely less on stuff, and more on people.

These are tough questions for the pushers of technology ghackara answer. Our economic system is centered on technology, so it would be no small matter if “tech” ceased tne be an end-in-itself in our daily lives. Technology is not going to go away, but the time to discuss the end it will serve is before we deploy it, not after. We need to ask what purpose will be served by the broadband communications, smart materials, wearable computing, and connected appliances that we’re unleashing upon the world.

We need tue ask what impact all this stuff will have on our daily lives. Who will look after it, and how? In the Bubble is about a world based less on stuff and more on people. Thackara describes a transformation that is taking place now–not in bubbls remote science fiction future; it’s not about, as he thee it, “the schlock of the new” but about radical innovation already emerging in daily life.

We are regaining respect for what people can do that technology can’t. In the Bubble describes services designed to help people carry out daily activities in new ways.

Many of these services involve technology–ranging from body implants to wide-bodied jets. But objects and systems play a supporting role in a people-centered world. The design focus is on services, not things.

And new principles–above all, lightness–inform the way these services are designed and used. At the heart of In the Bubble is a belief, informed by a wealth of real-world examples, that ethics and responsibility can inform design decisions without impeding social and technical innovation. Paperbackpages. Published February 17th by Mit Press first published April 1st To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about In the Bubbleplease sign up.

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Lists with This Book. Jul 10, Kars rated it really liked it Shelves: It’s interesting to read this eight years after publication.

The parts where Thackara heaps examples on top of each other to convince readers tech has pervaded all aspects of life haven’t aged well. However, many of his suggestions for how to go about designing for this world are still relevant, perhaps more so now than ever before. It’s sad that these ideas haven’t found wider acceptance in tech.

In the Bubble : John Thackara :

Jan 07, Greggo rated it it was amazing. Great view of where design and the world should go. May 14, Tom Schulte rated it really liked it.

Admittedly this book is dated and seems most so when it considers the unnamed Internet of Thing reality that is already upon. Still, it is insightful and valuable to read, especially for engineers. Thackara tells us of ancient Greece’s symposiarch who could enforce drinking or nude dancing on too-serious feasters.

In this, he reminds us that humor helps keep an open mind. It does feel it still takes a very open mind to see a need for sustainability in the ecology invention and production t Admittedly this book is dated and seems most so when it considers the unnamed Internet of Thing reality that is already upon. It does feel it still takes a very open mind to see a need for sustainability in the ecology invention and production that underpins our consumerist society.

This New York-based organization advocates for a free, distributed and open geographic information infrastructure to help citizens engage in meaningful dialogue about their places. Thackara doesn’t speak to this directly, but I was drawn to think of our automotive-based society: I think centuries hence there will be examinations on our decades like we look book at slavery-based economies asking “What were they thinking?

Nov 08, Asaad Mahmood rated it it was ok. There are good generic takeaways, but the book itself is very situated, which makes its potential quite limited in my opinion. Mar 22, Vuk Trifkovic rated it it was ok. First chapter still holds true and goes hard.

Then it fizzes out in mids starry eye optimis regarding “triple bottom lines” and “ubitech”. Ah, the simple times Aug 07, Orton Family Foundation rated it it was amazing.

In my former life as an anthropologist, I had the unique experience of spending time with the Hadza people, the last hunter-gatherer tribe in East Africa. From food gathering to building shelter and social networking they are strategic opportunists par excellence who waste nothing, least of all good information.

Designing in a Thackars World resonated so deeply with me. His ideas and work, though far-ranging, center on a vision of sustainability and ecology of place. Sprawl, he deftly argues, results from a conspiracy of intentional policies, practices and design decisions played out across industries and systems, none of which are random.

He writes, for example, about The Open Planning Project, a New York-based organization that advocates for a free, distributed and open geographic information infrastructure to help citizens engage in meaningful dialogue about their places. Some of the innovative projects and efforts he cites, while intriguing, are barely underway and not yet ready for prime-time. Read more reviews by the Orton Family Foundation in thakara Scenarios e-journal at http: Mar 29, Andreas rated it liked it Shelves: An interesting “inspirational catalogue” of design trends for the 21st century.

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Rather than the top-down, technology-focused design of the 20th tthackara, Thackara makes the argument for a new kind of almost organic design based on: Don’t expect design to b An interesting “inspirational catalogue” of design trends for the thaclara century. Don’t expect design to be a solitary process of creation, build on others’ work, adopt and adapt it for the new designs you do.

Share your creations in turn open source it – get people to use it early.

In the Bubble: Designing in a Complex World by John Thackara

Design should always be considered participatory design: It only improves through use and response. All in all, good stuff Dec 15, Steve rated it it was ok. This book disappointed on many levels. The author organizes the book poorly, with ideas from earlier chapters being recycled through later ones. There’s also contradictions, sometimes hot air, and a bit of self-promotion I don’t really care about Doors of Perception, the conference he organizes.

I think I was looking for something a little more practical with respect to design in a complex world, and all I got were other people’s ideas Paul Hawken, Ivan Illich, Janine Benyus, Malcolm Gladwell This book bibble on many levels. I think I was looking for something a little more practical with respect to design in a complex world, and all I got were other people’s ideas Paul Hawken, Ivan Illich, Janine Benyus, Malcolm Gladwellsomewhat half-baked musings and details of experimental projects that may never make it into actual products or processes.

Jul 01, Caroline rated thafkara it was ok. I must’ve put this book on my list while in library school and it’s a little outdated. And, it didn’t thrill me. I did enjoy the section on designing things to mimic nature, and had a good laugh at all the outlandish things that could’ve been the next big thing.

In the Bubble: Designing in a Complex World

The networked bench that allows you to have a cell phone conversation through it? Feb 14, Elan rated it it was ok. A lot of insights, but not so pleasant to get through. The sort of book I sort of wish had been presented as a series of bulletpoints. Was about the give up and put it down, but then it finished—the last 96 pages are endnotes, so that’s good, I guess. Kept forgetting that this was written ib years ago. The ideas are still quite relevant i. Jul 24, Oyceter rated it liked it Shelves: Jan 15, Louise rated it really liked it.

Mar 06, Yu Zhu rated it really liked it Shelves: The first two chapters are cool,then the logic goes a little bit messy. The theory is awesome but if you even can’t make this method noticed by designer, it’s just academic.